My Nurse Consultant

HealthCare Management & Consulting Advocate

When it is ever okay to discuss pay?

When is it ever okay to discuss pay? The norm has always been to be quiet on pay and not discuss it. Human resource (HR) frowns terribly upon discussing pay among colleagues , but is it really all bad?

Here are pros and cons of discussing pay

  1. Knowledge is Power– The more information you have, the better able you are to negotiate. If you don’t know then you cannot ask for what you rightly deserve
  2. Motivating Factor– For most people, having information is one way to jump start them on what they need to do, which is one of two options- either remain where they are or go somewhere else to get better payDiscussing pay
  3. It eliminates Discrimination/Unfair Practices– if everyone knows everyone’s pay, it makes it harder to discriminate and pay different rates to different people for the same skills/experiences or jobs.

The cons

  1. Jealousy/Competition– Not everyone has the same level or years of experience which are often times factored into the pay scale. So discussing pay can bring up these emotions which may make the work place a bit tedious.
  2. Less Productivity: if workers are focused on what others make, it may lead to jealousy above causing loss in productivity as the workers may feel slighted and less inclined to perform

It is beneficial discussing pay when you are from different geographical areas or work places. It is very helpful to people who have plans of moving or simply want to make a comparison going forward.

As a parting word, at all times, make sure that what you earn is what you deserve (or more) for the skills/experiences that you provide.

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All Nurses Want- R.E.S.P.E.C.T

All nurses want is R.E.S.P.E.C.T! Nursing is one profession that capable adults are treated as immature children

You don’t respect nurses when you do the following

  1. Don’t acknowledge that nurses have a life outside of work, otherwise why would you schedule an educational meeting on a one time basis without considering the need for different shifts
  2. Not ask for input/feedback when making policy changes that will affect the lives of these capable adults
  3. When you send out missives and enact immediate punishment for alleged offences without conducting a thorough investigation
  4. When you dictate to nurses without trying to generate inclusion and buy in

Here are things that nurses need

  • Nurses need to be heard
  • Nurses need to feel they matter
  • Nurses need a seat at the table
  • Nurses need R.E.S.P.E.C.T

Nurses are capable adults and respect should be something accorded to all groups of people. We should generallybe more mindful and respectful of each others skills, capabilities and in general as human beings!All Nurses Want- R.E.S.P.E.C.T

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Nursing is Hard…

“Nursing is hard” is a popular mantra that you hear constantly and if you are a new nurse, you almost allow your self to be brainwashed by it. Don’t be!

Yes, nursing does have its difficult days but then, so does every other profession.

The importance you attach to a statement determines how you respond to it. It may be argued that because nursing has added implication of dealing with people’s lives, this makes it hard. But that is exactly what you went to to school to be trained for and why you continue to update your skills on a daily basis.

Don’t let “nursing is hard” school of thought rob you of the joy that is nursing. Find little ways that are important to you to rejuvenate yourself daily and when you are away from work, BE away from work. The work will be there when you get back.

Nursing is not a field of martyrs as some people might make it out to seem- it is a respected profession as has been shown time and again by the public’s vote of trust.

Nursing is a profession which like any other profession has its difficult days. But you should be careful not to let the difficult days overshadow the beautiful days.Nursing is hard

Let’s keep things in perspective.

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How to Manage Work place Take Over

Work place take over occurs all the time. In the field of health care as in other businesses, buy-outs may be at any time.  And depending on how it is handled, a new company taking over should not necessarily mean the worst outcome.

Five Tips in handling new company buy outs

  1. Be Informed: Getting information is the first critical steps towards knowing what to expect from the new company. Knowledge is indeed power and the more knowledge you are armed with, the better able you are to face whatever challenges that might come your way and how to react to it.

Do your own independent research on the new company- find out from reputable sources what you need to know.

2. Listen: Keep your ears open. Keep abreast of the situation by paying attention to what is going on around you. Remember also to listen more than you talk.

3. Network: Your new employers taking over is a chance for you to network. Don’t overdo it but be sure to network politely

4. work place take overAsk Questions: When ever the opportunity arises, ask questions. Find out what direction the new employers are seeking to take. This is important to know because it helps you determine, if that direction is one that you are willing to take or not.

Work place take over does not have to be a bad thing- it can either be a stepping stone for you or the added push that you needed to get your career on a different track.

You are boss of your career and as such it depends on you to steer yourself right. Don’t leave that control in the hands of another person.

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Long Term Care Nursing- A Culture of Toxicity

With the new nurse graduates, I decided to share this as a way of forewarning them of what to be aware of. I got the same advice when I graduated but sadly did not listen. Please don’t be me, learn from me!

Long Term Care (LTC) is NOT for the faint of heart. To thrive in  Long Term care, you have to be prepared to eat or be eaten- it is a toxic enviroment. My journey into LTC started as a new nursing graduate. Prior to that, I had heard of many horror stories but I chose to ignore this believing that I could overcome. Of course,  I had all the energy of a new graduate nurse with all the dreams as well. I was wrong; the stories were true- LTC is toxic.

From the corporate office whose only goal was how to spend the minimum amount of money while reeling in the profits to my co-workers who were also evil as all get out.

LTC was the place where I lost my new grad innocence- it was the place where I learned not to trust any co-worker.

LTC was brutal

  • It was brutal in the way co-workers stabbed each other in the back just to get ahead and sometimes simply for the heck of it
  • It was brutal with the revolving door, constant turn-over and having to work short
  • It was brutal in the way you had to avoid pitfalls of which there were many

LTC was poorly managed

  • It was poorly managed through the poor caliber of people hired to run the place. The Administrator that was only concerned about cliques, the DON that only wanted to supervise from a distance; the unit managers that had alternate personalities, it was rough.

LTC was a hell hole

  • The residents could also make life miserable for you with all the false stories that were told

I use was, because I refused to be burned any longer. I got out of LTC and went into home health. Now I care for my patients, as they should be cared for, one at a time too.Be warned, if LTC is where you choose to be, make sure that you go into it with your eyes open wide. It is not for the feeble. LTC will drain the life out of you if you let it. Be the wiser, RUN from Long Term c.

By Saren K

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